20130130

New Series of Bluegrass Guitar Tabs Released

Image634951259522604287Online bluegrass music lesson provider Layne Publications has just released a number of bluegrass guitar tabs. The company has the largest collection of guitar, mandolin, and banjo tabs all over the web including some for no cost.

Layne Publications continue their efforts to further enhance their excellent collection of bluegrass tabs.

These tabs have played a major part in the company's success as an online educational platform for students willing to learn bluegrass music online from an expert. Layne Publications have now added a number of new guitar tabs to their website to help students learn to play with a wide variety of songs.

These new bluegrass guitar tabs are now available for download in the official website of Layne Publications for a nominal price of $2.99 only. With each download, customers receive a premium tablature, 2 MP3 backing tracks, and chord charts for the respective songs. All buyers are provided with a download link so that they can download it once more if they lose the previous file. Some popular tabs amongst the new releases include Happy Birthday, Gold Rush, Your Love is Like a Flower, and many more.

2 comments:

Devin said...

I just wanted to say I like the site. I was wondering...I'm in the market for a new acoustic guitar and I'm trying to find the best guitar for bluegrass. I want one that's really loud with a good tone that will cut through the banjo sound. Does anyone have any suggestions? Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

Prescription Bluegrass Blog said...

Devin,

Thanks for the compliment.

Most bluegrass guitar players like a good Martin Guitar for the same reasons you've described and because they have other good features. However I don't know that you'll ever get an acoustic guitar to cut through the banjo. They're just not built that way.

Better to work with the banjo player(s) on their own technique. It's never (even during instrumental breaks) about just one instrument in the band. It's about blending. And that is never a constant. You can't just figure it out one time and then say you'll do it that way all the time.

Every song is different. Every stage, every room, every crowd is different. There are so many variables that come into play when a group is trying to blend that it is a never-ending job and it requires that all members of the band learn how to listen to each other at all times.

Good luck in your search.

-Editor